Vegan nutrition and iron.

Iron is important and gives us energy and makes our bodies function along with other nutrients.

Some foods affect iron status positively, some food like things do not.

Foods that reduce iron absorption:

Soy (different compounds), cacao (tannins and phytates), unsoaked grains, unsoaked/unsprouted seeds and unsoaked nuts (phytates), spinach, chard (oxalic acid although this mostly effect just the iron in the spinach and not other foods unless cooked and eaten in high doses). Sprouting and soaking helps in reducing phytates.

Foods that increase iron absorption: 

Overall healthier nutrition, better gut health and vitamin C. Also, whether or not the soil has iron in good quantities and if the roots of the plants are long (unlike hybrid annuals), affects the actual iron content. Some plants have genetics that absorb iron, but how much iron actually is absorbed depends upon the conditions of the growing environments.

There is some iron in the standard things like: Sprouted lentils, soaked/sprouted steamed chickpeas, soaked cashew nuts, soaked and grounded chia seeds, ground linseed, soaked hemp seeds, soaked pumpkin seeds, kale, dried apricots and figs, sprouted quinoa, but there are also wild herbs that can be added in with a lot higher amounts of iron. Dried mulberries actually have 75% of iron based on the minimum amount per 100grams, and there are other ones that have much higher iron. There are lots of factors that affect the amount of iron your body can absorb from your diet. Drinking some key lime juice at the same time as the greens are consumed helps a lot too.

Here are some other sources you can check out: amaranth leaves, anamu, chickweed, dandelion, elderberries, marula, sarsaparilla leaves, Yellow dock, burdock (a little of the young leaves), cilantro, prunes and there are other ones you can find.

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